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commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
of civil rights, selma, and stonewall, manhattan bossuet's the village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happened in congress this week that may have an impact -- will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch mcconnell reaching an agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact president? >> what the house did it is illustrative of what will be ahead of us. they have not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling, this budget crisis. they have no leverage over the president. they discover they have no leverage. now they have to find a way to back down. this is their face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. you will see more of this. the president is in a much stronger position of dealing with the congress and house republicans. >> you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion. but i dissent, the president, like any other, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant central dramatic figure, w
, civil rights and as you mentioned stonewall manhattan's west village where the modern gay rights movement was born. a couple of things happen. harry reid and mitch mcconnell of reaching someort of agreement on the filibuster. nothing profound. also, they will raise the debtbt ceiling tmay 18. how will this have an impact on the president? >> they are still going to -- they he not gotten over the defeat from november 6. we are going to tie everything to the debt ceiling.. now they have the letter. it discovered that they have no leverage. now have to find a way to back down. this is their face saving device to k kick it down the road until may.y. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the house republicans. >> agree with that? >> all with respect colby's opinion. the president, like any reelected president essentially, absent a national event where he becomes the dominant and central dramatic fire, watches his popularity be rationed out day by day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe he will be as strong a year from now. i think what we are facing iss not
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
: then the ceremonies got underway. the former chair of the naacp and widow of the slain civil rights leader delivered the invocation. >> we invoke the prayers of our grandmothers who taught us to pray, "god, make me a blessing." let their spirit guide us as we claim the spirit of old. there's something within me that holds the reins. there's something within me that banishes pain. there's something within me i cannot explain, but all i know, america, there is something within. there is something within. >> brown: perhaps the most rousing moment of the day came from the brooklyn tabernacle choir singing "battle hymn of the republic." ♪ his truth is marching on ♪ marching on >> brown: and then the first oath taking as supreme court justice sonia sotomayor the first of the president's two appointments to the court swore in the vice president. the musical moment changed when james taylor performed america the beautiful alone on his guitar. ♪ o, beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ for amber waves of grain ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ ♪ above the fruited plains ♪ america, america >> brow
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
functioning of our -- of our country. i mention in particular the long, long struggle for civil rights and how that was held up by a small minority which happened to be in my party, by the way, at that time. but nonetheless, the senate through the years has really been the chamber that takes a long and hard look at legislation, where we have the right to amend, where we have the right to discuss and to embark upon discourse on legislation in a manner that allows even the smallest state, the smallest state to be able to be represented as much as a large state. not true in the body that both the occupant of the chair and i used to serve in in the house because there, as you know, large states can dominate because they have got most of the members. but here, the senator from connecticut is just as important as a senator from california or a senator from iowa, or, let's see, what's the least popular state, wyoming, i think, maybe or alaska is equal to a senator from new york or florida or texas or cal. so this has been the great equalizing body. and so having served here for this time, i think i h
his religion allows for something he said his faith opposed and now, he believes marriage is a civil right. in the past he flatly declared waits not. did anyone in the main stream media point that out? not a single person. these last four years and events have provided countless examples of the media shirking their response skbriblt not doing their due diligence whit comes to veting obama. maybe it's fatigue from veting. bush administration for eight years. in case you've forgoten how different the coverage was for president bush, here is a trip down memory lane. let's take a look at president bush in 2005 what. a difference. >> world news tonight, sunday, president bush prepares for his second inauguration. >> in a time of war, is it time for a lavish celebration sfl. >> do you think the balls and some of the excess are appropriate? >> many wondered whether, given the war... and all of our security challenges right now is it appropriate to have a lavish inaugural celebration. >> sean: someone pinch me. is there a doubt how biased the main stream media is when it comes to barack obam
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
state senate. virginia republicans waited until this one particular democratic senator, a noted civil rights lawyer named henry marsh, they waited until senator marsh left town on monday for the day to go to the inauguration of president obama. virginia republicans had to wait until he was gone because the state senate is equally divided in virginia, 20 republicans and 20 democrats. but with henry marsh gone for the day, it's no longer an even divide, right? it's 20-19. with that advantage, republicans decided to spring on the senate and spring on the entire state a whole new set of redmaps. a whole new set of gerrymandered maps for the state, drafted to put republicans in charge in virginia effectively permanently. because they did it when henry marsh was away, republicans succeeded in this plan by one vote. in their stealth attack to change the maps. that one vote was the missing vote of the senator who had gone to the inauguration. that's how they started the week. now virginia republicans are moving on to the next part of it. they're moving on to the electoral college scheme part
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
is getting high-profile, but unlikely support. one of the nation's oldest civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit to try and stop the city. hazel dukes the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> it's about -- >> economic disparity and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big, corporate people, again, to have their own way. >> convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp argue that small and minority owned businesses will feel a disproportionate impact. nonhispanic blacks have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp filed a legal brief, to say to tackle the public health crisis on obesity, it developed a holistic educational program, called project health. the funding for that according to the naacp's website is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. the new york chapter received $75,000 in the past two years. is there a conflict? >> absolutely not. >> if this was the first time coca-c
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
jean quan said that threatens work in loss angeles has been advocating for civil rights groups and local committees. >> the manhunt for the suspects involved in a shooting of an undercover officer in oakland is over. police have in custody five men are believed to have gained ties. >> the shooting happened monday night between seminary in harmon ave. police say, the officer was working as part of a new violence reduction crying team and was alone when he was confronted and shot by several suspects. >> the officer is now at home recovering from his injuries. >> sexual assault allegations against 49ers star wide receiver michael crabtree do not appear to be holding up under investigation. >> investigators say there were looking into a complaint that crabtree had assaulted a woman at a hotel party after the 49ers defeated the green bay packers in a playoff game earlier this month. >> however, witnesses tell investigators that crabtree did not assault anyone and police have not found any physical evidence of the attack. >> crabtree has been denied any wrongdoing and has been cooper
and efferent dirksen on civil rights. that would not have happened if the government hadn't been divided and it wouldn't have been as easily accepted by the american people if it had not been divided. if this democratic president and mixture of republicans and democrats in congress say to the american people, we got a real fiscal cliff for you. all the programs that you depend on to pay your medical bills aren't going to have enough money to pay them, and we're going to have to make some changes to deal with that, people won't accept that, especially if it comes from both of us. and as far as who's supposed to propose it, well, senator corker and i proposed it. but we're not president. and we're not president. and i don't know what the governor of virginia's 1350er7bs experience was, but if i waited, we'd still be driving on dirt roads. the legislate,all 535 of us will say, no, mr. president, we couldn't possibly do it that way. let's do it ail bit different and we'll come to a result. that's the way our system works. we got three months to do it. i hope that the republican leader will c
, as if that was -- he called it some sort of new, modern civil rights movement, which is kind of ridiculous. it really left a poor taste i think in a lot of people's mouths. jon: charlie hurt from the washington times. it's good to have you on. thank you, char here. >> thanks, jon. heather: coming up next secretary of state hillary clinton facing tough questions about the terror attack in benge, libya. but what more did we learn about the administration's response to the murder of ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans? we'll take a look. and golf star phil michelson says taxes in california, well they are so high he may have to leave. he's not a loan, though, thousands of californians are facing the possibility of losing mor more than half their income to the tax man. we'll take a look at why. (announcer) at scottrade, our clients trade and invest exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxed did, taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't built about -- build that, you didn't build that small business. "that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)